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gunshowcomic:

yes this was very educating for everyone involved.

Welcome friends and enemies. B9 Kingdom has a new store open up at Topatoco, where you can get some excellent art books from excellent artists. Never forget that. Never forget that good art is just a click away. Please consider helping that art out.

Source: gunshowcomic.com
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gunshowcomic:

that baby there, last panel, left side. she’s all ‘shoo aint gonna phase me’

The babies! the babies! More babies friday. Baby week.

Source: gunshowcomic.com
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maxistentialist:

cah:

Donor’s Choose

Day ten was the best day of the 12 Days of Holiday Bullshit. We took everyone’s dollar and used it to purchase supplies for high-need public school classrooms across the U.S. using DonorsChoose.org.

Last year, we did a pay-what-you-want holiday pack and raised $70,000, which we donated to the Wikimedia Foundation. We weren’t sure if the Wikimedia foundation would want to be associated with us, so we didn’t check with them, we just sent over a check and announced it online. It turns out that this was a really bad idea, and that it caused some confusion on Wikimedia’s end, so this year we called up DonorsChoose.org early and told them that we wanted to make a big holiday donation. They were a pleasure to work with, and we even got to meet with DonorsChoose.org’s founder and CEO, Charles Best, in Chicago.

The Letter & Thank You Notes

One of the best parts of buying supplies for a classroom on DonorsChoose.org is that the kids write you thank you notes. We knew that this was one of the most powerful parts of the experience, and we wanted to share it with the recipients of Holiday Bullshit, so long before the holidays we made a “test donation” of $4,000 to a few fund a few dozen projects. We received hundreds of thank you notes, picked our favorite ones, and reproduced them as part of the letter that we sent to everyone on day 10:

Today we donated your dollar to charity.
If you don’t like that you can go make your own shitty card game.

DonorsChoose.org is an online charity that makes it easy for anyone to help students in need. Public school teachers from every corner of America post classroom project requests, and you can give any amount to the project that most inspires you. Today we gave $100,000 to teachers in high-need classrooms to buy supplies for their students. Find our how we spent your money at CardsAgainstHumanity.com/donorschoose.

Donating the Money

In December, we started spending our $100,000 on DonorsChoose.org projects. Each of the eight Cards writers and Trin and Jenn were responsible for spending $10,000, and we each picked the projects that appealed to us.

Daniel, who’s been living in Hawaii, focused on projects local to Hawaii public schools. Josh, who is getting his PhD in physics, funded science projects and field trips to planetariums. David funded music projects and bought a lot of instruments for students. Jenn, who is weird and enjoys running, funded a lot of fitness projects. Max funded a lot of projects local to Chicago.

The Infographic

After we had given our full $100,000 (we actually went a little over, there were a lot of good projects), we worked with DonorsChoose.org to get as much data as we could about how we spent the money.

Josh started crunching the numbers in Mathematica and Max laid out the results in a ridiculously long infographic that broke Photoshop.

You can see the infographic on how we spent everyone’s money at CardsAgainstHumanity.com/donorschoose.

One More Thing

Max and our junior designer Emily worked over a weekend to put together a few new design ideas for DonorsChoose.org, and pitched them to Charles the next time he was in town. DonorsChoose liked them, and invited Max to join their national advisory council.

I joined DonorsChoose.org’s national advisory council to help with the design and UX of the site!

Source: cah
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http://blog.jeffgerstmann.net/post/74759021163/this-email-is-too-long-to-make-it-onto-the-podcast

jeffgerstmann:

This email is too long to make it onto the podcast this week but I felt I should let people see… this.

Dear my fav podcast, although all podcasts are created equal
Just like all humans are equal and all living things that harbor energy are equal

I am writing you today to explain what I…

Source: jeffgerstmann
Link

http://blog.jeffgerstmann.net/post/72409950326/own-your-shit-tumblr-users-i-occasionally-click

jeffgerstmann:

Own your shit, Tumblr users. I occasionally click through to the people that like or comment on posts and I see a lot of “here’s my shitty drawings” or “I made this awful music” and so on. Stop it. You made that shit, you’re probably into that shit, be into that shit. Don’t downplay the fact that…

Source: jeffgerstmann
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"Over the just the past few months, I’ve seen an increase in stories that seem outrageous on first read, spread like wildfire, days later get dubbed a hoax, and eventually, with additional information, end up in some sort of ethical gray area between the boundaries of truth and fiction. There’s the famous twerking video hoax reveal of Jimmy Kimmel, the never-ending story of Andy Kaufman’s death, the anti-gay waiter tip hoax (or not), Slate accusing Buzzfeed of not fact-checking the Awful First Class Passenger story hoax, and just recently the telemarketing robot that might be fake — but with additional digging no one is really sure, so it’s tough to say.
I consider myself media savvy, with decades of sniffing out the truth for my own edification and running a news-savvy community of over 60,000 users, and still I find myself feeling duped, confused, but also strangely mildly entertained at the same time. The rise of the 24-hour news cycle and the stresses on news departments to post the latest attention grab are combining with the churn of rumors and tips coming out of Twitter, Facebook, and Reddit (plus the emotional twists of Upworthy and BuzzFeed) to make unbelievable stories a near daily occurrence, with fact-checking falling a bit by the wayside."

Source: niemanlab.org